if-only-angels-could-prevail:

please watch this

10.21.14 82

I’m trying to expand my knowledge of musicals. Any recommendations of shows I should listen to?? :)

10.21.14 3

sourcedumal:

LMFAOOOOO Wayne knows

“Just remember, even your worst days only have twenty-four hours”
— 10 word story (via eteriese)

charliexxx:

squidventure-time:

this shook me to my very core. 

i love this so much. 

charliexxx:

squidventure-time:

this shook me to my very core. 

i love this so much. 

theselfproclaimedultimatenerd:

Shoutout to everyone having a bad week. This is Wednesday, it’s halftime. Grab a Gatorade and psyche yourself up for the comeback.


❝Age can’t define love. I was in a relationship that was very intense when I was 17. I definitely had those feelings of lust and infatuation. The love that I experienced with him was true in that moment. As a teenager you’re not jaded, you are free to be vulnerable because you’re not putting up big walls.❞

Age can’t define love. I was in a relationship that was very intense when I was 17. I definitely had those feelings of lust and infatuation. The love that I experienced with him was true in that moment. As a teenager you’re not jaded, you are free to be vulnerable because you’re not putting up big walls.

In the drama school’s main acting studio in the Purnell Center for the Arts sit nearly a hundred students and faculty members. Their chatter is quiet, but the air brims with excitement. It’s the last voice lab of the year, a weekly class where musical theater students perform a song of their choice—one that relates to their lives. For today’s performers, the seniors, this is the last voice lab of their Carnegie Mellon careers.

Graduating senior Corey Cott is about to become a school legend—and it has nothing to do with hitting a high A.

Cott’s mother and father have made the trek from suburban Cleveland. His longtime girlfriend, Meghan Woollard, is here, too. One by one, the seniors stand, reminisce on the past four years, and then sing. It’s weepy. It’s touching. It’s beautiful.

When Cott’s turn approaches, he brings with him a notebook to read a passage he wrote about Woollard over a year ago. He looks up several times, meeting Woollard’s eyes across the six rows of audience members that separate them. When he gets to the page’s end, he drops the notebook and begins Josh Groban’s “When You Say You Love Me.” He sings the song directly to Woollard, his eye contact seldom wavering. If you know Cott—and after four years of some of the hardest acting training the world has to offer, his classmates do—then you know about his famously sweet heart.

Just as he hits the song’s final note, Cott drops to one knee. His classmates gasp. Woollard’s fingertips fly to her mouth. She makes her way through the crowd as if in a trance. Squeals pierce the air. Woollard, tears welling in her eyes, holds out her hand, as if to have a ring placed on her finger. “I have to say the words first,” shouts Cott, fighting the crowd’s noise and his own tears. “Will you marry me?” Only Woollard can hear him now, and barely so, as the entire room has gone berserk. This is—after all—drama school.

— [x] (via benfankhauser)